Saturday, July 25, 2015


Anyone who has ever gone to a Madonna concert knows the woman has stamina. And at 56 years old, Madge has no plans of slowing down. In a recent interview with the Associated Press, Madonna said that she wants to continue working into her golden years. “I like to compare myself to other kinds of artists like Picasso. He kept painting and painting until the day he died.” Madonna continued: “I don’t think there’s a time, a date, an expiration date for being creative. I think you go until you don’t have anymore to say.”

If anyone can serve as proof that an expiration date is meaningless, it’s Madonna. Her career took off in 1983, when she was only 25, and her pop songs and fishnet stockings quickly became a staple of the eighties. She continued to reinvent herself decade after decade, outlasting all her contemporaries.

So, she might be on to something when comparing herself to Picasso. Madonna’s trajectory, much like the Spanish artist’s, is divided into clear, defining eras: Picasso had his Rose and Blue Periods; Madonna had her Blond Ambition phase and sexually charged Erotica era. Picasso revived his painting with Cubism; Madonna found Kabbalah and reinvented her sound with “Ray of Light.” There are even similarities in their personal lives. Picasso was a notorious womanizer with a weakness for younger women, while Madonna has made no secret of her fondness for 20-something men.

Surrounding herself with young, talented people is another way that Madonna has managed to stay relevant. In 2003, she made VMA history when she locked lips with Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera during a medley performance of “Hollywood” and “Like A Virgin.” For her 2008 album, Hard Candy, she collaborated with Justin Timberlake and Pharrell. Last year, she popped up for a surprise duet on Miley Cyrus’s MTV Unplugged special. This June, she released a new video for her song “Bitch I’m Madonna,” which rounded up an impressive cast of cameos including BeyoncĂ©, Katy Perry, Nicki Minaj, Chris Rock, and Kanye West. And with age, comes an even savvier strategy: Madonna has now conscripted this summer’s most popular star, Amy Schumer, to be the opening act during her Rebel Heart tour. Really, if Taylor Swift learned the art of assembling a squad from anyone, it was from Madge.

Location:Traction Ave,Los Angeles,United States

Monday, July 20, 2015


Live Nation announced today that Madonna will make a return visit to Manila Wednesday, February 24th, 2016, at the Mall of Asia Arena. The Manila performance is presented by Globe and tickets will go on sale starting Sunday, July 26 at 10:00 AM.
The Rebel Heart Tour begins in Montreal on September 9, 2015 and continues throughout North America and UK/Europe before heading to Asia, New Zealand and Australia next year.

Icon is Madonna’s official fan club and members will receive a special code to access the Icon pre-sale Tuesday, July 21st, at 10 AM.

Tickets for the Rebel Heart concert in Manila will go on sale on Sunday, July 26 at 10:00 am through SM ticket outlets, or call 470-2222.

Citi® Cardholders will be eligible for a pre-sale opportunity beginning Wednesday, July 22nd at 10 AM through Thursday, July 23.

Globe customers will be eligible for a one day pre-sale Friday, July 24 at 10 AM.

Wednesday, July 15, 2015


You co-produced several songs on Madonna’s new one, including her new single. What do you make of the ageism she faces?

She created the world we live in. It already sucks to be a woman in the music industry, but to be a boss woman is even harder. She sold out her tour in minutes, but no one seems to want her to succeed — “Madonna, we’ve been there, done that, now we’re about Kim Kardashian.” Her song “Ghosttown” was a guaranteed Number One for anybody else, but she didn’t get a fair shot. With “Bitch I’m Madonna,” everyone said there’s no way it will go anywhere, but I’m like, “Screw it, it represents you more than anything.”

Monday, July 6, 2015


Dear Madonna,

I owe you an apology.

For several weeks I’ve been thinking of writing you an open letter and, until the moment I wrote it, I was going to ask you to change.

Your wardrobe, videos and words linked to the latest “Rebel Heart” tour have attracted negative criticism, and I almost joined the majority.

I was going to confess that I grew up on your music. From wearing lace gloves when I was 5 years old to recently listening to your songs while dancing with friends, your voice has been well represented on the soundtrack of my life.

But as I grew up, you seemingly did not.

You’re 22 years older than me. That didn’t seem like such a big deal when I was 5 and you were 27. Then, somehow, I became 34 and you reached 56, and I just wanted to give you a hug and say, “So, maybe you should put the fishnets under a pencil skirt.”

I was wrong.

You’ve made a career out of raising eyebrows with hits “Like a Virgin,” “Papa Don’t Preach,” “Like a Prayer,” “Erotica,” “Justify My Love,” not to mention every relationship you’ve ever had.

Those were all number one songs, by the way.

And fans are paying more this year to see you on the Rebel Heart tour than they did three years ago.

Music reviews in Rolling Stone have called you and your art a “provocative extravaganza.”

You made headlines for several other things too: the kiss with Britney Spears, saying you wanted to go on a date with Drake and falling off stage during the recent Brit Awards. And those are just a few things from the 2000s.

There are plenty of things from the 80s and 90s that prove you were waging a war against racism, sexism, hate crimes and bigotry long before the listeners were brave enough to loudly stand up with you.

You have a history of proving if anyone in the room is going to be uncomfortable, it’s not going to be you.

And I love that about you.
I still believe a little discretion goes a long way, but I love that someone like you is out there.

I love that you’re 56, and still bold and unafraid to show up at the Grammys with more cleavage than women 30 years younger than you.

It seems to me your latest war is against sexism and ageism – and rightfully so.

Nobody makes a big deal of it when 56-year-old male rock stars date 20-year-old women. It’s not just accepted, it’s expected.

But you’re a 56-year-old woman in America. That means you can’t date someone as young as Drake, who is 28.

Nobody writes about how 71-year-old Rolling Stones stars Keith Richards and Mick Jagger are still wearing tight leather pants – and, really, who is going to tell them no?

But you’re a 56-year-old woman in America. That means how you look and what you wear will always be under heavy scrutiny.

It means because you are a mother of four, you cannot be sexual.

It means it doesn’t matter if you built 10 schools in Malawi.

It means Piers Morgan can say, “Falling off the stage, Madonna, is God’s way of telling you you’re too old to cavort like a hooker.”

(But I wouldn’t worry about Mr. Morgan. He survived less air time on CNN than Dog the Bounty Hunter.)

It means middle-aged men and suburban moms get to judge you and say, “Put it away. Your age is showing.”

And I love that you keep saying “No.”

You will not be silenced. This is not a stunt. This is who you are. This is who you’ve always been.

You are the woman who made a mockery of the wedding dress, made the cone bra famous and taught us to vogue. Of course you’re wearing fishnets and thongs in public when you’re 56.

I won’t be doing it, but I’m glad you are.

So to amend my previous error in judgment, let me offer my sincerest apology for trying to make you fit into a severely outdated perception.

Don’t put it away now, Madonna. Your awesome is showing.



Source :PennLive

Sunday, July 5, 2015


“IT’S AMAZING, all the talk of my ‘required’ retirement. When I was thirty, it was all, ‘when is she going to quit?’ Then 35, 40 and beyond. This absurd assumption — that once you reach a certain point you have to stop doing what you love doing.”

Madonna back in 2008.
That’s Madonna, talking to me about six years ago! She meant it then and she means it now — more now than ever.

During this chat, Madonna said: “Look, Liz, I’ll quit when you do!”

I said; “Okay, you and I will be the last girls standing at the rodeo.”

M: “You mean when we’re not straddling the saddle?”

JUST IN case nobody picked up on the fact that 56-year-old Madonna Louise Veronica Ciccone is not going to wedge herself into a black evening gown and begin crooning standards, the pop icon’s latest video put an end to that fantasy.

Gathering together a batch of guest stars including Kanye, Beyonce, Chris Rock, Miley Cyrus, Katy Perry, Madonna romps through a minor song, “Bitch, I’m Madonna” with major implications.

Critics have had a fine time pointing out that her album “Rebel Heart” has not been a raging success, and that she needs to stop doing what she’s doing.

Well, Madonna blithely showed that hit album or not, at the snap of her fingers she can not only command any producer in the world to work with her, but she can command the world’s hottest pop stars to come play in her backyard.

“Rebel Heart” is a hot mess, but was probably affected by the hacking of all her songs, forcing her to rush the album out. (There are 25 tracks!) But “RH” contains about eight great numbers, so why complain? The video, “Bitch, I’m Madonna” — which has the star rampaging through a nightclub — is a kind of joyful hot mess. Just relax and have fun. (The people who rain on her parade are usually twenty years younger and much less agile!)

Wednesday, July 1, 2015


Los Angeles-based Nick Fouquet is in many ways the ultimate California dude — tall and lanky, with a shaggy blond mane that simply begs to have a hat put on it — but don’t call him a milliner. His approach to hat making is anything but traditional. “I’ve always wanted to do my own thing,” he says, “and it’s such a niche market and undervalued accessory. To me, hats are the pinnacle of elegance. I’m not here to reinvent them — but to do it with my twist; not over-the-top or dramatic, like a milliner might.”

There’s almost a hint of disdain in Fouquet’s voice, in fact, when he says the “m” word. “There are maybe 30 people in America and 300 people in the world who know this trade,” he says. “When I started, a lot of hat makers were appalled that I would use fire, throw paint on a hat, distress the felt, reinvent shapes. And I was like, ‘You’re like, 80 years old, what do you know?’” Indeed, a Nick Fouquet hat captures a lived-in aesthetic that brings a much-needed breath of fresh air to the market; the designer’s signature detail is a strike-anywhere match tucked into each hat’s brim. “TSA at the airport is not a big fan when I roll through with the matchsticks,” he admits. “They get very suspicious.”

Now, about five years since he’s entered the hat business, Fouquet puts out two collections a year, has partnered with Colette and has a collaboration with Barneys New York planned for this fall, and has a celebrity following that includes Madonna, Pharrell, Bob Dylan, Carine Roitfeld, Gigi Hadid and Sia (who wore a Nick Fouquet hat to perform at the afterparty for the Calvin Klein men’s show in Milan last week). But commercial success and the glitz of celebrity endorsement notwithstanding, Fouquet sounds most excited when he talks about working with individual clients through his bespoke business. “The client always thinks of things that I would never think of, like, ‘Let’s put 100 feathers on the brim,’” he says. “We just get these ideas. And I’m not afraid to fall flat on my face.”

Though Fouquet hasn’t ruled out expanding his line in the future — “In the grand scheme of things, yeah, I see a bigger brand,” he says — for now, his focus remains singular. “It would be preemptive to get into shoes, bags or ready-to-wear at this point,” he says. “There’s so much more that I have to say with hats.”

$900-$3,000, available at the Nick Fouquet flagship at 853 Lincoln Boulevard, Venice, Calif., and at Barneys New York starting this fall,

Source : NyTimes